SHOT Show 2017 and New Gun Tech

BrevisSupressor

Every year at SHOT Show, fun new tools and technologies are launched. The Shooting, Hunting, Outdoor Trade show is a giant event centered on recreational shooting and hunting gear, but it also has become a place for police and military equipment to be demonstrated. And while there are a lot of very cool new gadgets this year, like tiny thermal scopes for less than $2,000, or brand new pistols from brand new manufacturers, the most interesting technologies I read about this week weren’t actually announced at SHOT Show.

Delta P Design has begun selling a brand new titanium suppressor, which is made entirely on a 3D printer. There are other companies, in America and New Zealand, who have been creating suppressors with 3D printers, usually out of titanium or inconel superalloys, but the Brevis II has a new design that makes the most of this manufacturing technique. First, it is extremely small, only 3.7 inches long. DPD is utilizing a mysterious interior design that replaces the traditional baffles with some new structure, probably something that couldn’t be created any way other than 3D printing.

This also makes it extremely light, weighing less than 10 ounces, and made entirely in one piece, with no joins, bolts or welds. Despite the small amount of metal that it is made of, it is able to contain the blast of a high-pressure rifle round. This tiny suppressor isn’t going to set any records for quietest silencer ever made, but it is incredibly impressive how quiet it is considering that it is smaller and lighter than most muzzle brakes. It is so unobtrusive that it’s almost like adding a flash suppressor to a rifle, rather than a fully capable sound suppressor.

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The Big Takeaway from 2016, and What it Means for 2017

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I’m noticing a lot of doom-and-gloom moping in other editorials summing up 2016, mostly because Donald Trump won the election, and a lot of celebrities died. Morbidity and mortality aside, the thing that most vividly stands out to me from 2016 was the ludicrously wild inconsistency. Some of the loudest voices clamoring for subjective morality and tolerance have suddenly become the loudest voices clamoring for absolutism and rejection.

Now, as long as I’ve been alive, I’ve heard relativists insist that there is no absolute truth, and then instantly demand absolute adoption of their viewpoint. I’ve seen radicals insist on total and complete tolerance for everything, and then in the same breath demand that someone else be violently un-tolerated. I’m no stranger to double standards and incoherent oxymorons, but 2016 exceeded all my expectations for such lunacy.

As you might guess, most of it revolved around the presidential election, but things didn’t get really crazy until after the votes were cast. You want some examples? In early December an architectural group floated an idea to hide the Trump Tower logo with giant inflatable pig balloons, in order to protect the sensitive eyes of New Yorkers from that micro-aggression that is the name of their President-Elect.

After calling Trump hateful and illogical, they described their balloon plan as “a gesture in support of those of more rational, optimistic and inclusive minds.” But apparently minds that aren’t optimistic enough to handle reminders of the election results, or inclusive enough to stand the sight of a hated name. This is more a gesture of stopping one’s ears and pretending not to hear.

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And a Happy New Year!

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2016 was full of the many blessings, much laughter and joy, numerous lessons learned and trials endured, many friendships and relationships deepened, and through it all we have seen the loving, kind, and gracious hand of the our Lord guiding and sustaining us day by day. We look forward to 2017 with great joy and expectation of the work and sanctification that the Lord has in store for us.

That they should put their confidence in God
and not forget the works of God,
but keep His commandments.
Psalm 78:7

How Free Market Economics Gave Us Cheap Digital Camera Technology

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Today I was looking over a few camera accessories that I might want to purchase before the end of the year, and was reminded of how good we videographers and photographers have it, technically speaking. It seems only yesterday that I was wrestling with the almost crippling limitations of tube cameras and tape recorders to try to get images that looked cinematic, decent, or even discernible… and today I take modern camera technology for granted.

In the last 20 years I’ve gone from terrified that I might permanently burn out the pickup tubes of a $30,000 BetaCam camera, to frustrated that a $9,000 HDV camera isn’t compatible with certain broadcast standards, to slightly peeved that I can’t get absolutely every feature I want in a $400 camera (and those numbers, by the way, are not adjusted for inflation).

And in reading through various reviews and blogs and forums today, I noticed that lots of folks are peeved that they can’t get the perfect camera yet; a magical camera that could combine the best features and patents from multiple companies. My perfect camera, for example, would be a small mirrorless body combining Canon’s autofocus technology and color science, Sony’s most sensitive image sensors, Olympus’s in-body stabilization, Panasonic’s wifi remote, and Blackmagic’s high-bitrate recording formats.

Some commenters have complained that this magical camera doesn’t exist because of too much competition in the in the market, not enough government regulation of features, and that darn old capitalism letting greedy camera makers keep the prices too high. This is an odd sentiment, since I can’t think of any product or field of technology that has benefited more from competition, lack of regulation, and free market economics than digital video cameras.

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James is Thankful Too!

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Although James has been a large part of our last two thankfulness posts, we thought we’d let him get in on the action and record all the things that James is thankful for. He’s one of the most enthusiastically cheerful and happy babies I’ve ever known, and his zeal for life is evident in a lot of these shots. He’s a very social baby and loves to be with people, especially his two favorite people in the world: Mommy and Daddy.

This very beloved sheepskin from Uncle Chad and Aunt Becky is indispensable. As soon as he catches a glimpse of it, he immediately lets out a long “oooohhh”, and a huge grin spreads across his face while he pops his thumb into his mouth.

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Give Thanks With a Grateful Heart

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Last week Isaac walked through a typical day in our lives, and recounted the many things we have to be grateful for in our every day life. In keeping with this theme, I decided to show you a somewhat less typical day that shows a different part of our lives: Sundays.

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Sunday mornings usually start with Isaac and James wrestling on the bed while I make breakfast. I love hearing James shrieking in delight from the other room, and getting to watch Isaac as a daddy fills my heart with joy. I’m really not sure who enjoys these morning romps the most – Isaac or James!

I’m also very grateful to the Lord for giving me such a kind, caring, and gentle man to be my husband, and the father of my child. His care for our little family, and his diligence to provide both physical and spiritual sustenance is another great blessing for which I am very thankful!

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Speaking of physical sustenance, Isaac has taken on the job of grinding our coffee beans fresh every morning, and of course James has to get in on the action too. I’m so thankful for how much James wants to be with us, and do everything we are doing. It’s also a very sober reminder of how much he watches and imitates everything we do. And while it may be a bit cliche, coffee is certainly on my list of things to thank the Lord for this year!

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Things I’m Thankful For This Fall

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This fall, Heidi and I have been reading some books by James Herriot. His memoirs look at the life of a country veterinarian in northern England, during the 1930s and 40s. This is a fascinating but difficult time, before the discovery of antibiotics, and before British farming was really mechanized. However, what really stands out about his books is his tremendous attitude of joyfulness and thankfullness. Despite the incredibly hard work and often harsh weather, Herriot is overflowing with gratitude for the opportunities that he was given, the wonders that God has created, and the blessings that he received, great or small.

I have been convicted by how ungrateful I can be when my life is so much more comfortable than a country vet’s, and so much better than I deserve. For the next couple of weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, Heidi and I are trying to be more diligent about marking our blessings and thanking God for them. Because I don’t have James Herriot’s incredible grasp of the English language or storytelling ability, I’m going to rely on pictures to describe a day in my life.

This is who I get to see first, every day:

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…and this is who I get to see second:

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Those two pictures alone prove that I am indescribably, unfathomably, unbelievably blessed. But there’s more. So much more:

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How Bad Economic Theory Helped Trump Win

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In case you hadn’t noticed, America had an election last week. I was looking forward to the hysterical rhetoric settling down after the final count came in, but it doesn’t look like that’s happening anytime soon. Anti-Trump protestors are burning cars, burning products made by pro-Trump companies, and burning up the airwaves blaming everyone they can think of for Hillary’s loss and the end of democracy.

But several commentators that I’ve been listening to on NPR place the blame for our new president-elect squarely on those actually responsible – the voters. The polite ones blame “white working-class voters,” and the less polite ones blame “white uneducated voters,” but they are talking about the same folks: lower-income blue-collar types who have traditionally voted Democrat and were assumed to be Democrat-for-life. Long-time Clinton crony James Carville seemed utterly despondent about the future of the DNC after this treachery, but other democratss are optimistic, since they believe that working-class people will soon be a thing of the past.

After all, they pointed out, we live in the app economy now! The future of America is in super-liberal Silicon Valley, and all future voters are in liberal colleges and universities this very minute, getting the degrees that their idiotic, republican-voting parents never got. Actually, this week those students are demanding a break from studying so they can bemoan the horror of a Trump presidency, but they’ll get back to getting those degrees soon. While everyone else is trying to divide the vote into old and young, hateful and inclusive, uneducated and enlightened, white and unwhite, I’d like to talk about this crazy idea of a future without working-class people.

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How Many Guns are in the United States?

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There are a lot of magic numbers in journalism – numbers that get thrown around so often and are so well known that they simply must be true, even though there are never any citations of research or studies mentioned. One such magic number is “approximately 300 million,” which is apparently how many privately owned firearms are floating around the United States. This number kind of makes sense if you don’t really think about it. After all, there’s “approximately 300 million” Americans in the USA, some of whom own guns and some of whom do not. Seems like that would even out and make that a good estimate. However, I’ve been hearing about “approximately 300 million” guns since I was a kid, and I know that there have been an awful lot of firearms purchased since then. Let’s look at some hard data.

Of course, the United States does not have a central firearm registry database, so there is no hard data on exactly how many guns exist here. But, because NICS background checks are required for all non-private firearm sales (even gun show sales), we could have a pretty good idea of how many guns are being bought and sold… sort of. Not every background check equals a gun sale, because some folks can’t actually pass the background check. This is apparently only about 0.6% of would-be purchasers. On the other hand, one background check often means one person buying multiple firearms, so all we can say for sure is that a lot of background checks must mean a lot of gun sales.

And there have been an awful lot of background checks! From 1999 until 2008 they averaged around 10 million per year, and then began steadily climbing until the 23 million checks we had last year. NICS has run over 225 million background checks in total, and if merely a quarter of those purchases were two guns instead of one, then there have been “approximately 300 million” firearms bought by private citizens in the last 17 years alone!

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The Gospel Map at GISMO NYC

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Ever since Heidi and I made our gospel map, we’ve been really excited to see all the places that it has gone. We’ve shipped it all over the world, the video has been watched millions of times on various social media platforms, and now it’s going to be (briefly) on display in a museum! GISMO NYC is a forum for folks in the geographic information systems industry, and this weekend they have an event at the Queens Museum where our Gospel Map will be included, both in print and animated forms.

It looks like a really neat free event with some great speakers, so if you happen to be in New York this weekend, you can stop by to look in on new mapping techniques and various maps, including ours. If you aren’t able to make it, you can always get the print version of our map from The Western Conservatory, and watch the animated version here:

I really enjoy seeing how other designers are using maps to communicate information, or converting other types of data into maps, and I wish I were going to be there. Also, I just realized that we finished that project over two years ago. I’ve been mostly busy with product design and CNC projects lately, and I find that I am itching to make some new maps or build some new data visualizations. Anyone have any ideas?