Educating for Real Life

A few months ago, we were asked to write an article for CHEC’s homeschooling magazine about how we were homeschooled. We have, of course, talked a lot about how we were raised, the ways we want to imitate our parents, the things things we would like to do differently, and the many differences that we see between our two families. However, when we sat down to condense all those conversations into this short article, we were a little surprised by how many identical conclusions our respective parents came to, and how many of them we want to stick to.

When Heidi and I were born, our respective parents began to pray about how we should be educated. When they choose to teach us at home, it wasn’t for lack of options; Isaac’s parents lived in Washington D.C. suburbs completely surrounded by private schools, and Heidi’s father was actually teaching at a well-respected Christian school in Ohio.

And even in those early days of home education, there were various co-ops and pre-packaged curricula that they could have used, ways of moving a “regular” education from classroom to home without any other major changes. These would have been easier, faster, and in many ways cheaper than how our parents ended up teaching us. But they wanted to give us educations that were completely different in their focus, not just their location.

To do so was hard, time-consuming, and expensive in many ways. We’ve watched our parents change careers, take massive pay cuts, and move across the country (or around the world) just so they could teach us diligently and according to their understanding of Scripture (Deuteronomy 6:7). Today, they would say that it was all worth it, and so would we. Their efforts have perfectly prepared us for where we are today, and what we are doing.

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Making Holsters on the CNC Machine

So, I’ve mentioned earlier about my work with our CNC machine, and a few tools that make that work a little easier, but I haven’t every really described that the work actually entails. Last week I made short video for T-Rex Arms’ Youtube channel showing what that looks like, and most of the steps involved.

That video describes making a specific holster for handguns using the Inforce APL weapon light, but the process is the same for every holster that we make on the machine. First, a precise 3D model is constructed of whatever weapon or light we are making a holster for. Then we adjust the dimensions of that model ever so slightly to give ourselves the right friction and retention and mounting hardware that the holster needs. This adjusted model is carved out of a high density plastic, and then we can vacuum form hot Kydex directly onto this mold.

When the kydex cools, it gets slapped onto a second mold that is still bolted to the CNC machine, and a special endmill drills all the holes and cuts the kydex into the finished shape. As I mentioned in the video, each of these steps takes a couple of tries, but it doesn’t take too long for very precise, very identical holsters to made very quickly.